Church in Houston


Arkansas, that is

Houston Arkansas Methodist Church

This place of worship, formerly Houston Methodist Church, now Jesus Name Community Church of Faith, Hope & Love was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994.

From the looks of things, when Houston Methodist Church of Houston, Arkansas, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places it was not a minute too soon. The national register listing says the “period of historic significance” was 1900-1924 and the architectural style is listed as “Colonial Revival.” A plaque (the dark square right of the door) says Houston Methodist Church was established in 1890, but does not reveal a construction date for this building.

St. Boniface Catholic Church, New Dixie community Arkansas

St. Boniface Catholic Church

The building date for St. Boniface Catholic Church, just a few miles to the east is not a mystery. This story started with St. Boniface on the Photo of the Week page at Corndancer dot com. Click here to go there and see pictures of St. Boniface and get in on the start of the story.

While we have better information on St. Boniface than we do on Houston Methodist, what we do know is that both congregations had their beginnings within just a few years of each other. Undoubtedly, members and parishioners knew each other, did business with each other, and their sons and daughters probably had eyes for each other. The latter with callous disregard of parental leanings.

This peaceful coexistence was then and is now an on-the-ground manifestation of the religious freedom which is at the core of our American culture. I believe I can say this with reasonable authority since I find no historical records of the Methodists and Catholics of Perry County attempting to obliterate each other. Would that we could say the same thing for other cultures not so inclined that are now impacting ours.

Houston Arkansas Methodist Church

The church bell seems suspended in time. Corrosion and a few too many coats of paint are the probable culprits for this tonal paralysis. But I suppose, it's the thought that counts.

There’s not much else to say about this fine old structure except “good luck.” It is a fine example of community churches of the late 19th and early 20th centuries in these parts — which has obviously seen better times. The condition of the building, however, does not diminish the spiritual importance of its message to believers who frequent its halls. Pray for paint and labor.

Down the road and into the sun

You can see golden evidence of a setting sun in the last picture of the old church.  This condition prompted me to observe to my friend Joh Phillipi who joined the fray on this trip, ” … we’re burnin’ daylight,” the favorite quote of “The Duke,” hisself, John Wayne in The Cowboys. That being said, we lit a shuck and headed toward Bigelow. Shortly after our arrival, we noticed the crooked house below. We had to stop and shoot.

Crooked house in Bigelow

Should it be, " ... there was a crooked house ... ," or "The leaning store of Bigelow?"

The Bigelow visit was indeed a fortuitous stop. We got a great shot of an old building with the visual panache available only with low- in-the-horizon, late-winter-setting-sun-illumination. Stopping for this target of opportunity caused a delay which enhanced the next shot, albeit unbeknown to us at the time.

Heading south to Arkansas Highway 10, our route would take us past Lake Maumelle, a large impoundment which is the potable water supply for Little Rock. That is not its only claim to fame. Lake Maumelle is also home to the Grande Maumelle Sailing Club, an organization, the members of which for the most part are rabidly dedicated to the sport of racing sailboats. In a former life, I helmed many a race on the face of that lake.

Moonrise on Lake Maumelle

The moon is rising in the east as the sun sets in the west at Lake Maumelle, Arkansas. Shot from the centerboard launch ramp on the Grande Maumelle Sailing Club premises, a racing organization.

Knowing the layout, as I noticed the moon rising in the east, I knew where the would lunar lake look would be just too cool. That place is the centerboard launch ramp on the sailing club premises. We made a beeline to the lake and arrived in the nick of time.

A great ending to a great day.

But wait, there’s more

See more pictures from this trip plus larger versions of the ones we have posted on Corndancer Photo of the Week and Weekly Grist. It’s our Weekly Grist Gallery. Low-carb, low fat, low-sodium, but slightly addictive. Some things we just can’t help.

Thanks for dropping by,

Joe Dempsey,

Weekly Grist for the Eyes and Mind
http://www.joedempseycommunications.com/
http://www.joedempseyphoto.com/
http://www.corndancer.com/joephoto/photohome.html

This old, old, house


Notice the front porch on this old farmhouse, no visible means of support.

Notice the front porch on this old farmhouse. It is a miracle of unintended cantilever construction with no visible means of support, since the porch and porch supports, like the last residents, have long since departed the scene.

When I first saw this old house northeast of Parkdale, Arkansas, I recalled an old fifties song , written by Stuart Hamblen, “This Old House.” The song was allegedly inspired during a hunting trip with legendary actor, John Wayne. Believe it or not, the version of the song performed by Rosemary Clooney garnered the number one slot on the Billboard chart. This story started on the Photo of the Week page at Corndancer dot com. To see a more pictures of the house and get in on the start of the story, click here.

room

The west room: Decorated with a door on the floor and multiple remnant layers of wallpaper.

This old house is typical of farm employee residences furnished by the farm owner. It shows evidence of a number of residents, at least, if the number of wallpaper layers are any indication.

est

The east room: Lots of natural ventilation with native materials and roofing iron decor.

Divided into four rooms, the house is simple with few amenities past basic shelter. One of the chimneys probably vented a kitchen stove and the other a pot bellied wood heater.  One had to tip toe through the tulips, dandelions or whatever was in the yard for personal relief in an outhouse. In that part of the country, depending on the time of the year, slapping “skeeters” all the way was part of the trip.

And at Ladelle, Arkansas, another victim of the times, Deals Grocery. The store stands as a monument to simpler times.

Deals Grocery, Ladelle, Arkansas.

Deals Grocery, Ladelle, Arkansas.

We rejoice that our residences are not comparable with the ole farmhouse. We bemoan the departure of neighborhood stores. And life goes on.

Thanks for dropping by,
Joe

http://www.joedempseycommunications.com/index.html
http://www.joedempseyphoto.com/
http://www.corndancer.com/joephoto/photohome.html

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