Meandering through south Louisiana


If you are the sort to simply enjoy seeing stuff, you are well advised to occasionally spend a couple of days in south Louisiana. That’s where we caught a glimpse of a disheveled Orange Grove Country Store, where this story started. The sighting is revealed on the Corndancer dot com Photo of the Week page. Click here to see the store.

river crossing

The west bank of the Mississippi River near New Roads LA grows smaller as we ferry eastward toward St. Francisville LA, a delightful town of no small historic significance. The town was our next stop on this Louisiana odyssey, after Orange Grove Store.

St. Francisville LA

The first European settlers arrived in St. Francisville in 1773, some 236 years ahead of us. Somebody’s been there ever since. During the War Between the States nastiness, the town was bombarded by boat-borne cannons. Fortunately, the community survived. If you want to see what life was like in the 1800s, St. Francisville is a sure bet. The town is not large, but more than makes up for its size with a more than respectable concentration of  “stuff to see.”

Grace Episcopal Church in St. Francisville LA. The congregation had its start in 1827. It was invested as a Parish in 1839. The church was shelled in the War Between the States. Final restoration was completed in 1880. The church grounds include a large cemetery. Birthdates in the 1700s are frequently noted on gravestones in the cemetery.

Grace Episcopal Church in St. Francisville LA. The congregation had its start in 1827. It was invested as a Parish in 1839. The church was shelled in the War Between the States. Final restoration was completed in 1880. The church grounds include a large cemetery. Birth dates in the 1700s are frequently noted on gravestones.

New Orleans

No “seeing stuff” trip to south Louisiana is complete without a stop in New Orleans. Of course in NOLA, there is also stuff to eat and stuff to hear. Be assured, we consumed plenty of both. The city’s tourist business is healthy and continues to rebound. After all, there is stuff to see there that is nowhere else.

Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition. A cannon aimed toward the Mississippi River stands guard over Jackson Square in New Orleans' legendary French Quarter. In the background is St. Louis Cathedral, founded as a parish in 1720. It is the oldest Catholic cathedral in the United States.

Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition. A cannon aimed toward the Mississippi River stands guard over Jackson Square in New Orleans' legendary French Quarter. St. Louis Cathedral, in the background was founded as a parish in 1720.

The streetcars in New Orleans are, well, legendary, just about like everything else there. The fares are reasonable, but be sure and bring correct change. The conductor can’t make change. The street car round trip out St. Charles and back is well worth the time and pittance of money required. You observe some NOLA quaintness, weirdness, fine old homes, shops and a plethora of other eye candy well worth seeing.

I'm not certain what the names of these New Orleans street cars are, but I'm willing to bet it's not "Desire." These are disgorging and taking on passengers at the Toulouse Stree stop in the French Quarter.

I'm not certain what the names of these New Orleans street cars are, but I'm willing to bet it's not "Desire." These are disgorging and taking on passengers at the Toulouse Street stop in the French Quarter.

Thanks for dropping by,

Joe

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5 Responses

  1. Oh my … the striking sky on the Corndancer pic!

    There’s something about the St Francisville picture that intrigues me. The large old church among the midst of trees with an adjacent cemetery made me want to know more about this town (since I never heard of it).

    Hope you enjoyed your trip away from home!

  2. Frank, google – st. francisville la – and you will find a number relevant links. The town is small and friendly. There are a number of ante-bellum structures which have been preserved and/or restored. The old church grounds have numerous live oaks with the attendant dangling Spanish moss. The parish is active and the church is alive and well after 180 years.
    To the north of St. Francisville, the city of Natchez MS is much larger and provides even more of the old south, well preserved.
    Thanks,
    Joe

  3. Wow … there they are … many Joe-like pics! Looks like a place you could spend more time photographing in the future … well, at least after you go to Fifty Six … ha ha!

  4. I’m glad you enjoyed the cyber-trip Frank.
    Joe

  5. Re the Orange Grove Store porch collapse: that was Hurricane Gustav. The porch has been fixed, but the whole structure is badly in need of care. We were married in that store years ago, when it was in better shape and occupied by an antique collector. Re the chimney there: at one time it served an old cypress cabin (postbellum). My husband used to live in it. Sadly, the cabin was sold and moved some years ago, long after he had moved out, and we hear the new owner simply let it fall apart. .

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