Buttercup attack


The old truck while seemingly under attack by yellow flowers is in good company. The picture is a study in contasts. Something on it's last legs is surrounded by new growth and renewal.

The old truck while seemingly under attack by yellow flowers, is in good company. The picture is a study in contrasts. Something on its last legs is surrounded by new growth and renewal. A reminder from Mother Nature.

The old Ford in Cornerville AR (Lincoln County),  appears to be under attack by a yellow horde of buttercups. In southeast Arkansas, such attacks are common this time of  year. The trip to find this old Ford started on the Photo of the Week page at Corndancer dot com. Click here to see the giant killer buttercup and a garden under buttercup attack.

This old chicken house near Rowell AR on US Highway 63 appears to be floating on a sea of buttercups. The area around Rowell seems to have more that its share of buttercups this year. It's hard to imagine having too many flowers nearby.

This old chicken house near Rowell AR on US Highway 63 appears to be floating on a sea of buttercups. The area around Rowell seems to have more that its share of buttercups this year. It's hard to imagine having too many flowers nearby.

A single buttercup plant, by itself, is a dinky little pipsqueak. It’s skinny and has an almost thread-like stalk. These plants are smart. You rarely not see just one. It’s more like one million, so to speak. Seeing two or three acres of buttercups in one wad is not unsual.

The building above is an old “broiler house” as it was originally called, now they are simply called what they are, “chicken house.” This chicken house, like many in the area is no longer in use and now serves as a storage building. The houses are used to grow out chicks to market size. You may have munched on a drumstick which originated here.

Okay, it's a rare occasion. One misplaced buttercup is surrounded by purple clover blooms.

Okay, it's a rare occasion. One misplaced buttercup is surrounded by purple clover blooms.

The buttercup above probably feels like a hamburger salesman at a vegetarian’s convention — or vice versa. The red clover surrounding the buttercup was planted by the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department. During this season, it is hard to drive anywhere and not see the purple blooms.

The buttercups, on the other hand, are on their own and doing well. It is said by many that plants have survival instincts. If that is so, the buttercups are well programmed.

From the looks of things, the sign was hit with at least one load of number six shot. Some good ol' boy probably did not get the squirrels he was after and decided to alter the sign. Boys will still be boys.

From the looks of things, the sign was hit with at least one load of number six shot. Some good ol' boy probably did not get the squirrels he was after and decided to vent his frustration on the sign. Boys will still be boys.

Thanks for dropping by,

Joe

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5 Responses

  1. Whoa …. such a sea of yellow, and one that I haven’t seen before … well, maybe I have either with either another yellow plant or with buttercups that I didn’t know were buttercups. Oh well … now that probably doesn’t make any sense.

    It amazing we use the early blooming of some plants as a sign to usher in the season ahead. For me (in my area) it’s two domestic plants … forsythia and flox .. yet after the blooming seaon, they are so bland.

    Thanks Joe … and I really like the featured photo on CornDancer.

  2. Frank, the little yellow monsters pick and choose where they will propagate for reasons unbeknown to me. I surmise it is all part of some divine master plan. It is fortunate that we can witness the phenomenon. Thanks, Joe

  3. That truck in the field is a great shot Joe. Amazing work, as usual.

  4. […] a look at our 2009 buttercup post, “Buttercup Attack,” and judge for yourself. Also be sure and see the Photo of the Week page at Corndancer dot com for […]

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