Brighten the corner


red lilies in empty lot

These brilliant lilies are brightening their little corner of the world which happens to be in a former location of a family home, now an empty lot. The neighborhood, so far, has seen and gone past its best years. Someone forgot to tell the lilies.

Few of us can  find fault with urban beautification projects and organizations. In this day and time there is an abundant amount of urban acreage which can benefit from the noble efforts these people put forth. Since the prospective areas to benefit far outweigh available resources, we are grateful to our Maker for any help we can get.

I was reminded of that when I spotted these lilies in an empty lot in what I suppose one would call a “transitional” neighborhood. You know the type: a few homes, a few empty businesses, a few operating businesses, a partially filled strip shopping center, a couple of churches, and a Sears store turned public building — the neighbor hood can’t decide what it is.

ground spider in tunnel

Click on the picture and see more of Ms. Spider

Normally at this point in our Weekly Grist for the Eyes and Mind epistles, we invite you to take a look at a related subject on the current Photo of the Week page at Corndancer dot com.

This week, the invitation stands, but the subject is totally unrelated. Well maybe a little, these are Spider Lilies. Go to the Photo of the Week page and check out my visit with a ground spider in her home. She was reluctant about the whole thing but finally acquiesced to an up close and personal shoot on her premises.

Back to the lilies

red lilies in abandoned lot

Take a gander at the lilies up close. These are complex boogers that bear close examination. Each flower is akin to a free standing arts and sciences gallery.

Mother Nature has her own program of beautification, manifested in surviving plants, which for whatever fortunate reasons, are not molested by surviving humans. These lilies are propagating and bursting forth with beauty where we need it most. The tour buses will miss ’em but us serfs who ply the less-traveled public streets can benefit if we will take the time to notice. And further, to alert your friends.

Brighten the corner where you are

As I looked at the lilies, I harkened back to my “up-brangin’.” Giving the flowers a good once-or-twice-over, I found myself humming the old hymn, “Brighten the corner where you are.” Being one to share, I looked around and found a video with old church scenes and Burl Ives singing the hymn in his fine Southern Gospel mode, chased by Willie Nelson singing the “Unclouded day.” You will tap your feet.

 

red lilies in an old home place

Here are the lilies with a bit more of their environment. Mother Nature’s perfect balance of complimentary colors (remember what those are?)

The lilies and I appreciate you dropping by. Now brothers and sisters, let us go forth and brighten the respective corners where we are.

Thanks,

Joe Dempsey
Weekly Grist for the Eyes and Mind
http://www.joedempseycommunications.com/
http://www.joedempseyphoto.com/
http://www.corndancer.com/joephoto/photohome.html

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2 Responses

  1. Enjoyed the story. Wish I had some of the red ‘uns growing in my yard. We have a slew of surprise lilies of the Resurrection Lily flavor (Lycoris squamigera) pop up every year in beds scattered all over the property. Gorgeous creatures. They are known in the vulgar tongue as Naked Ladies — most commonly and more politely by the name surprise lilies. But the red spider lilies are surprise lilies, too. They are known by botanists as Lycoris radiata.

    One of the reasons these flowers aren’t molested by surviving humans is because of their naturally occurring perennial character. They grow as bright green lily fronds in the spring but produce no flowers. One is surprised when they don’t make spring flowers because the plants look so healthy. Then they die away and you forget about them.

    At summer’s end, sometimes earlier in the heat of August, they just jump up out of season so to speak — hence the surprise — and hang around in their brilliance a week or so, then fade away ’till next year. Some people call them rain lilies because they appear after a late summer or early fall rainstorm.

    You could dig a few of the bulbs from the empty lot after they begin to die and plant ’em in your yard. The existing crop won’t be harmed. The experts say they “naturalize.” They multiply. Put the bulbs in the earth at your house and wait for the surprise.

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